Stack Exchange

Pseudo-Macro Photography with a Telephoto Lens

2012-09-30 by . 6 comments

Post to Twitter

Macro photography is one of the all-time favorite pastimes of photographers. The enlargement of the small and microscopic to huge scale, the exploration of detail the naked eye cannot see. Sometimes it’s tough to decide what kind of photography to do on a day trip, when you can only carry so much gear. As a bird photographer, I tend to need large lenses and heavy gear, which makes lugging around a backpack full of additional gear impractical much of the time. Over the past year, I’ve come to enjoy a similar pastime that I call Telephoto Pseudo-Macro.

 

Strictly speaking, macro photography involves the use of a macro lens, which is capable of projecting a scene at 1:1 magnification (100% scale) onto the sensor. This “life size” scale is why its called macro, as we live and exist in the world at macro scale…life scale. Anything less than a 1:1 magnification, and you actually have close-up photography. The kind of fine detail that true macro photography extracts from a subject is quickly lost as your magnification factor drops with shorter lenses, however with a telephoto lens, you can often get very close to a subject and magnify them enough to become “psuedo-macro”. Not quite life size, but large enough for fine detail to exhibit well.

 

 

The benefits of using a telephoto lens for close-up “macro” photography work is two-fold. First is working distance, which can be several feet. This is great for photographing insects and other moving subjects that might take off if bothered. A long telephoto lens, such as a 500mm or 600mm lens, have relatively close minimum focus distances, and their narrow field of view will actually magnify your subject quite a bit on sensor. The second benefit is that you can use a teleconverter to gain even more focal length at the same minimum focus distance. A 300mm lens with an MFD of 4 feet with a 2x TC becomes a 600mm lens with the same 4 foot MFD. Your subject size grows in the frame by the ratio of the focal lengths squared, so in the this case, 300mm -> 600mm, your subject is 2.25x more magnified than before.

 

Despite the greater subject distance, most prime telephoto lenses offer superior image quality, sharpness, color, etc. So even at a distance of several feet, you can still extract a lot of small features at incredible sharpness. Renting a high-end lens like the Canon L-series supertelephoto lenses or Nikon’s  G supertelephotos will offer the best sharpness in any lens with good working distances. Getting a lens that has some kind of image stabilization or vibration reduction is a huge plus for insect pseudo-macro photography. You can stop thinking about shot stability, and start composing your subject in-frame.

With a fast telephoto lens and a good TC, you frequently have a maximum aperture of f/4 or f/5.6. This allows you to retain autofocus capability, which can be a godsend for chasing down fast-moving insects guzzling up flower nectar, or flora blowing in the wind. Another benefit of using a telephoto lens is the background blur, or bokeh.  At focal lengths beyond 100mm-200mm, noisy, cluttered background instantly blur into a creamy smooth backdrop for your key subject.

So, the next time your out and about looking for wildlife or birds, keep an eye on the nearby flora and ground. A telephoto lens, with its thin DOF, can make an excellent tool for pseudo-macro photography. And when your out and about, don’t forget to look strait down! You never know what subjects you might find (and you might save yourself some prickly pain, too!)

 

6 Comments

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  • Onlyjus says:

    Very nice photos! Next time I am out I’ll have to try this.

  • Dr Gopinath says:

    Great article but I found that the focus is only on Canon and Nikon. I am the proud owner of a Sony a57 and a Sigma 150-500mm lens and the combo works great, and is half the cost of a Canon setup. Havent you tried out other manufactures or are you one of those who sneer Non-Canon-Non-Nikon gear?

    • Tom Swain says:

      I have an a35 and am looking at a Tamron 70-300mm telephoto – Macro lens and this has definitely made me want one.

  • myrtle says:

    That was so amazing. Such a nice photos in here.

  • Mary says:

    These images are wonderful! I love macro photography, and, like you, typically do it with a long lens with a relatively short min focusing distance. I myself often encounter problems with motion blur at such high magnification, but your photos are spot-on, sharp and crisp. Nice!

  • kenny says:

    When I first started shooting with my wife’s old Rebel XT, I wanted to shoot flowers a lot for some reason (I’m guessing: easy subject, doesn’t move much, lots of color). I just naturally would reach (and still do) for our telephoto when I see that shot in my mind since we still don’t have a macro lens.

    I’ve heard decent things about extenders and telephoto lenses, but good idea on the teleconverter.

  • Leave a comment

    Log in
    with Stack Exchange
    or